Parishes of the area by Gustavus Hamilton (1919)

THE NAMES OF THE BARONIES AND PARISHES IN COUNTY KILDARE

By the late GUSTAVUS EVERARD HAMILTON MRIA

Published in the Journal of the County Kildare Archaeological Society Vol. IX, No. 3 (January 1919)

(Note on article: The final portion of the late Mr Hamilton’s Paper on the County Kildare Baronies and Parishes, having been discovered since our last issue was printed, it is brought to a conclusion in this number). Gustavus Hamilton (Mar 14 1882-May 2 1918) was a barrister from Ballinteer who died of TB at the age of 36 and was buried in St Nahi’s cemetery in Dundrum.

 Barony of Salt South

This barony contains 16,7777 acres, and eight entire parishes with parts of two others. It is part of Uí Fáolain.

Parishes

Castledillon graveyard

Castledillon graveyard

CASTLEDILLON, 1,125 acres. Diseart-Iolladhan, St Iolladhan’s hermitage. Thomas de Hereford granted to St Thomas’ Abbey the church of “Thillerdelan.” Thomas de Hereford granted to God and the church of “Sanctus Olan” of “Disser Olan” thirteen acres of his wood near the church and between the church and the ford called “Admactire.” In AD1202 Giovanni de Salerno, cardinal-legate to Ireland, confirmed to St Thomas’ Abbey the church of “Disserdelan.” In the list of circa 1220, the “Ecclus de Tristeudelan” is mentioned in the deanery of Saltus Salmonis. In the “new taxation” the “churches of Kyldonane and Tristyldelane (monastery of St Thomas) in the deanery of Saltus are returned as “not worth the service of chaplains.” The rectory of “Trysteldelan” was part of the possessions of the late monastery of St Thomas the Martyr, Dublin. The parish is in the diocese of Glendaloch.

Clonaghlis graveyard

Clonaghlis graveyard

CLONAGHLIS, 518 acres. Cluain Eaglaise, meadow of the church. Peter of Kaermerdin (Carmarthen) granted to St Thomas’ Abbey the church of “Clonacles.”. The chapter of Kildare confirmed to the Abbey the church of “Clonchles”. The name is spelled “Cloneglis” in Queen Elizabeth’s reign. In 1837 the name was pronounced “Clonachlis” locally, and was not known as a parish name among the people, who did not remember that there was ever a church of the name. The parish is made up of three detached portions.

Donaghcomper church in 1900

Donaghcomper church in 1900

DONAGHCUMPER, 2,323 acres, of which 262 acres are in the barony of Salt North. Domhnach an Chomair, church of the confluence; the confluence being that between the Liffey and “the stream, called the “Shinkeen” which passes under the public road, less than 100 yards form the west end of the church, and runs through Donaghcumper demesne, and into the Liffey, about three-quarters of a mile off.” The “Ecclesia de Donenachcumbyr” is mentioned in the list of circa 1220 in the deanery of Saltus Salmonis. In the ecclesiastical taxation of 1303, “Donaghcumper” is valued at forty shillings. Two inquisitions taken the Tuesday next after the feats of SS Simon and Jude, 1536, found that the rectory of Donaghcumper belonged to the Priory of St Wolstan. The parish is in the diocese of Glendaloch.

FORENAGHT, 578 acres. “Fornocht, a bare, naked or exposed hill. It gives name to a parish in Kildare, now called Forenaghts, in which ate plural form has prevailed, very probably in consequence of the subdivision of the original townland into two parts.” The parish consists of the townlands of Forenaghts Great and Little, and of Morristown. The Dindseanchas derives the name of the parish from Fornocht, one of four sons of Acher Cerr, King of Munster, slain there by Dubhthach Dubhaire, a Meath hero. Between 1194 and 1224 Richard de Lesse granted to St Thomas’ Abbey the Church of “Fornach” with all tithes and appurtenauces. The canons granted the said church to William, Richard’s son, “clericus”, for his life, paying one aureus yearly on the feast of St Tomas the Martyr. John de Lesse granted to St Thomas’ Abbey “whatever right he had or could have had in the church of Furnachbeg.” Between 1215 and 1222 the Canons and Chapter of Kildare confirmed to St Thomas Abbey all the ecclesiastical benefits of “Fornaht” and of “Fornaht Beg,” with all the chapels and other appurtenances. In the ecclesiastical taxation of 1303 the “churches of St Molyng and of the vill de Fornach” are valued at sixty shillings. The “church of St Molyng” seems to be the “Cros Moling” mentioned in Leabhar Laighean, 308, as near “Fornocht” but I cannot identify it. In 1837 the parish name was pronounced “Forenaghs.”

HAYNESTOWN, 459 acres. The name of this parish is spelled Heynston, in an inquisition of Philip and Mary, Hoyneston in the Fiants of Elizabeth, and “Heinston” and Heynston in an inquisition James I, In 1837 the name was pronounced “Hyenstown” locally. There bad been an old castle, of which only an arched gateway then remained, in the townland of Haynestown on the east side of a hill about a quarter of a mile to the left of the road leading from Rathcoole to Kilcullen There bad also been an old church in the townland, of which not a vestige then remained. The graveyard in which it had stood had fallen into disuse as a burial ground.

William Le Hyrais granted to St Thomas’ Abbey “all the right which he once said lie had over the right of patronage to the chapel of his vill near Kil, by ancient right appertaining to their mother church of Kil.” In AD 1202, Giovanni de Salerno cardinal legate to Ireland, confirmed the churcb of Kilkil to St Thomas’ Abbey. Between 1215 and 1222, Cornelius Mae Gealan, Bishop of Kildare, and the Canons and chapter of Kildare confirmed to the Abbey “the church of Kill with all chapels and of tbeir appurtenances.” In 1224-5 a dispute between Robert Hibernicus (or Le Hyreis) clericus, and the Abbey over the chapel of the vil of William Hiberiiieus (or Le Hyreis, Robert’s brother) was settled on the following terms:-

The Abbey granted to Robert “the chapel with its appurtenances, which legally belonged to their mother church of Kil, to hold same for his life, paying 2 shillings yearly at Christmas, saving to the mother church the fees for baptism and sepulture,“ and that the parishioners of the said chapel should annually visit with their oblations the mother church on the four solemn feasts (i.e., Easter, Whitsuntide, Christmas, and the festival-day of the mother church), ”Robert to procure that there should be a convenient and sufficient chapel in the VIII, and that there should be a suitable chaplain who would serve it properly.” In the ecclesiastical taxation of 1803, “Kyl” is valued at £10, and its vicarage at 30 shillings.” The. Rectory of Kill belonged to the monastery of Thomascourt by Dublin.

St John's CofI on site of ancient church in Kill

St John’s CofI on site of ancient church in Kill

KILL, 4,856 acres, of which 1,454 acres are the Barony of Naas South. Cill, a church. It has been suggested that tbis place is the Cill Corbáin where Cearbhall mac Muireagain (ob. A. D. 904) and eight other kings of Leinster were buried. It has also been suggested that it is Cill Náis, apparently from its proximity to Naas; but Cill Náis and Cill Neise seem to be the same place, and the name appears to be derived from some person named Ness. Between AD 1215 and AD 1222, Thomas de Hereford granted to St Thomas’ Abbey the church of “Kill” which was dedicated to SS. Mary and Brigid. This dedication to St Brigid is against the identification of Kill with Cill Corbáin, as the Anglo-Normans are not likely to have imposed a new dedication to St Brigid on any church, and so the original name was probably Cill Bheighde, Brigid’s Church. In 1837 the Ordnance Survey writer says: “This parish is under the patronage of St Brigid, whose church Cill Bhrighde, from which the parish takes its denomination, stood either on the site of or near the Protestant church, in the village of Kill. From the church there leads a pathway, by which St Brigid used to in go, to a well dedicated to her, which is called Tobar Bhrighde,, and lies in the townland of Hartwell, about half a mile from Kill. This path was called Boithrin Bhrighde (Brigid’s little road) and is known in the village of Kill even as yet by that name, and is pointed out by the people.”

Kilteel church

Kilteel church

KILTEEL 3,427 acres. Cill tSile or Cill Shile, Sile’s Church. This seems to be the “Tehcheli, cum, omnibus suis pertinenciis,” of Pope Alexander III’s letter dated AD 1179, setting out the churches of the diocese of Glendalocb. It is the “Kiltel “ of Pope Innocent III’s letter dated 1216. A commandery of the Knights Hospitallers was founded bore by Maurice FitzGerald in the thirteenth century, and the note added circa 1270 to the entry “Ecclesia de Kilhelle,” in the deanery of Balimore, is Prioris Hospitalis Jerusalem, in Hibernia, in usus proprios. An inquisition taken the 9th of May, 1543, found that the Prior of Kilmainham was seized. of this commandery or manor, together with court baron, leet, and frank pledge. Another inquisition taken on the feast of St Nicholas, the Bishop, 1544, found that the Prior of Kilmainham was seized of the rectory of Kilheale, annual value, besides reprises, £11 13s. 4d .

Church at Lyons

Church at Lyons

LYONS, 1,749 acres. This parish was a part of and derives its name from the Irish district of Limhain. Mr Lloyd has traced the various spellings of the name in the Anglo-Irish records from Lewan in AD 1217, Lenan AD. 1223 to 1260, Lyuns AD 1303, to Liones AD 1535. In the ecclesiastical taxation of 1303, Lyons was valued at 40 shillings. In the Fiants of Elizabeth the Dame is “the LYONS “or “Lyons.”

Oughterard, drawn by Austin Cooper in 1782

Oughterard, drawn by Austin Cooper in 1782

OUGHTERARD 2,886 acres. Uachtar Árd high upper-place. The name is derived.from the hill, 458 feet high, oil which the church and Round Tower stand, The present church ruins are said to have been built in 1609 on the site of an ancient chauntry connected with a nunnery, founded by a St Brigid (NOT Brigid of Kildare) in the sixth or seventh century. Between 1206 and 1223, Adam de Hereford granted to St Thomas’ Abbey the church of “Wechtarard.” Cornelius MacGealan, Bishop of Kildare (1206-1223) and the Canons and Chapter of Kildare confirmed to the abbey the. church of “Uhtrard.” In the ecclesiastical taxation of 1303, “Outherard” was valued at £12, and its vicarage at thirty sbillings. “The rectory or parsonage of Oughterarde…and the tithes of corn and grain of the rectory which are collected annually in the towns of Oughterard and Lyons by twelve couples of corn, in price every couple 13s. 4d.,” were parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of Thomascourt.”

STACUMNY 568. acres, Teach Cuimne, St Cuimin’s house.. In. Pope Alexander III’s letter dated A. D. 1179 to MaIchus, Bishop of Glendaloell, “techumni, cum omnibus suis pertnienciis,” is mentioned. In the list of circa 1220 the eccelesia de Stachcomeny,” ill the, deanery of Saltus Salmonis, is mentioned, but no note is appended to the entry. William de Piro, Bishop of Glendaloch AD 1192-1214, granted to St Thomas’ Abbey half the church of “Tachcuminy.” In the ecclesiastical taxation of 1303, Stacomeny, was valued at £21 6s 8d.According to all inquisition taken on the Tuesdsy next after the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude,. 1536, the rectory of Stacumny belonged to the Priory of St Wlstan. The parish is in the Diocese of Glendaloch.

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