Graveyards assessed in Burial Grounds Survey

Castledillon graveyard

Castledillon graveyard

Castledillon See Map Coordinates 53°18′31″N 6°35′01″W Grid ref 294452(E), 229602(N). Mostly mounds remain of what is locally known as a Dominican Abbey site.

Marked on the 6″ First Edition map from 1837, but marked as disused on the 25″ Second Edition map from 1897-1913.

No visible surface traces of the graveyard survive.

Clonaghlis

Clonaghlis

Clonaghlis  See map, coordinates 53°18′03″N 6°33′10″W, Grid ref 296518(E), 228797(N). The graveyard is located in the grounds of the original Lyon Demesne close to the Grand Canal. It is marked on the 1st edition OS map from 1837 as ‘graveyard’ and it is shown within a wooded area. The headstones date from the 18th-20th centuries. The headstone types are: rounded and simple grave marker. The majority of grave markers are simple type with no inscriptions. This may suggest the graveyard was used during the famine. The ground surface is uneven. The church measures about 14m by 7m but only the rubble remains are extant. Fragments of human remains lie on the surface throughout the cemetery. The site is of archaeological, architectural and historic interest. A poorly preserved church survives to foundation level. The graveyard contains various cut-stone grave markers from the 18th-20th centuries, which are of artistic and historic interest. Features of note are the wrought iron railings which form the boundary of the graveyard. bounday is Iron railings (demesne type). Mature trees (pine, maple, chestnut) throughout; ivy on trees; herbicide used throughout – there is practically no grass cover within the graveyard. Headstone transcriptions on Historic Graves website.

Church at Lyons

Church at Lyons

 

Lyons See map, coordinates 53°17′52″N 6°32′17″W. Grid ref 297506(E), 228476(N). A handful of headstones are upright, but most are leaning and broken. 17th to 20th century. Undulating ground surface. There are roughly laid gravel paths. There is one unlocked gate in the western wall, but the gate to church in the north-west corner is locked. The farm office has a key. The Aylmer, Cloncurry and lawless family are all in coffins in the chapel. Two families are still using the graveyard. Located on the 6″ First Edition map from 1837. The site is of considerable archaeological, architectural and historic interest, attesting to the long-standing ecclesiastical presence in the area. The remains of a medieval church survives with both nave and chancel and several blocked up windows intact. Features of note are a medieval font and armorial plaque which have a relatively rare survival rate. The site is partly maintained.Boundary consists of rubble stone wall in good condition. It is intact, but overgrowing. It is approximately 2m high and ‘1/2 barrel’ coping (cut stone). Trees/vegetation throughout. There is a hedgerow along the western side of the path leading to the church, separating it from the graves. Lichens cover 10-20% of the headstones and ivy 25% of the walls. It is currently being weeded and cleared. Headstone transcriptions on Historic Graves website.

Oughterard Co Kildare

Oughterard Co Kildare

Oughterard See map, coordinates: 53°16′40″N 6°33′55″W. Grid Ref: 295731(E), 226205(N), he church, round tower and graveyard are marked on the 1st edition OS 6″ map. The structures are marked as being in ruins on the 1897-1913 OS 25″ map. A gated gravel driveway leads NW from a local road and ends outside the walled cemetery enclosure. There is a (locked) gate towards the north of the eastern boundary wall. Stone steps north of the gate lead up and over the boundary wall. There are no internal pathways. The ground surface undulating. A vault with visible entrance is located NW of the ruined church which occupies the centre of the enclosure. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnother inaccessible vault abuts the west end of the southern wall of the church and contains the remains of Arthur Guinness. The church is generally rectangular (22x5m approx.), but has an extension in the middle of the south side. The ruins of a round tower stand near the SW corner of the enclosure. The site is of considerable archaeological, architectural and historic interest, attesting to the long-standing ecclesiastical presence in the area and has national monument status. The graveyard is enclosed by a rubble stone wall with a gate and a stile in the east wall and a stile in the north wall. The site of an Early Christian monastic site. The present church is probably built on the site of the earlier monastic church consists of a nave and vaulted chancel with a rectangular turret. Both gables and walls of the church survive but the walls have collapsed a bit.Features of note are the round tower (H 10m)a bell cote in the W gable.

Oughterard in 1874

Oughterard in 1874

The graveyard contains various cut-stone grave markers from the 18th-20th centuries, which are of artistic and historic interest. The remains of Arthur Guinness are interred within a family vault. A number of the headstone are leaning, broken or weathered. The round tower has been supported. The graounds are maintained Boundary consists of rough coursed stone wall with rough crenellations in excellent condition. No ivy cover. 2-3m high. Approximately 5 mature and 5-10 young trees dispersed throughout; mown grass covers the whole site apart from the ruined church; lichen on 95% of headstones; ivy located on mature trees and a small number of gravestones.

Whitechurch graveyard

Whitechurch graveyard

Whitechurch See map, coordinates 53°17′15″N 6°36′14″W. Grid Ref 293147(E), 227232(N): A ruined castle and church and baptismal font. The graveyard is located in arable land. It is marked on the 1st edition OS map from 1837 as ‘Castle and Church’ and ‘Grave Yard’. The church is located in the NW corner of a rectangular-shaped graveyard. The headstones date from the 18th-21st centuries. A good many of the headstones are broken or are simple grave markers which may have been used as part of famine interments. The ground is uneven consisting of many humps and hollows. The church and towerhouse are located on a low mound measuring about 27m by 6m. The E gable wall of the church survives and most of the towerhouse. The site is of considerable archaeological, architectural and historic interest. The present remains consist of a church and tower, traces of enclosures and a holy well. The walls of the church stand to their full height at E, N and S. Features of note are a rectangular font located in the church. The graveyard contains various cut-stone grave markers from the 18th-20th centuries, which are of artistic and historic interest. The boundary consists of a stone wall; double iron gate entrance with foot stile, weith mature trees along N boundary wall; Overgrown with brambles around church; mown grass; herbicide used around headstones.

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